US History

9-12

Course Outline

 

U.S. History provides a comprehensive overview of the history of the United States, surveying the major events and turning points of U.S. history as it moves from the America's cultural roots through modern times. As students examine each era of history, they will analyze primary sources and carefully research events to gain a clearer understanding of the factors that have shaped U.S. history. In early units, students will assess the foundations of U.S. democracy while examining crucial documents. In later units, students will examine the effects of territorial expansion, the Civil War, and the rise of industrialization. they will also assess the outcomes of economic trends and the connections between culture and government. As the course draws to a close, students will focus on the causes of cultural and political change in the modern age. Throughout the course, students will learn the importance of cultural diversity while examining history from different perspectives.

 

This course includes a broad series of lessons and activities that offer a variety of modalities for ultimate student engagement and content retention. Each unit contains a series of lessons that include introduction of content, virtual demonstration of that content, and repeated opportunity to practice that content, along with a quiz per lesson, exam per unit, and final exam at the end of the course.

 

U.S. History A

 

Module 1: Origins of New Nation (Prehistory-1765)

 

In this module, students discover the foundation of American society and analyze the constitution, its creation, and expectations. Students discuss concepts related to European colonies, the shaping of the American colonies and its process toward independence to become what is now known as the United States.

 

Many Cultures Meet (Prehistory-1550)

  • The American Indians

  • The Europeans

  • The West Africans First Encounters

 

Europeans Establish Colonies (1492-1752)

  • Spain’s First Empire in the Americas

  • The French Empire

  • England’s Southern Colonies

  • The New England Colonies

  • The Middle Colonies

 

The American Colonies Take Shape (1607-1765)

  • Immigration and Slavery

  • The American Colonies and England

  • Comparing Regional Cultures

  • Wars of Empire

  

Module 2: Creating the American Republic (1765-1816)

 

In this module, students analyze the significant events in the founding of the nation and its attempts to realize the philosophy of government described in the Declaration of Independence and the formation of the “new republic.” Students discuss concepts related to further discussion around the constitution and the foundations of the American government.

  

The American Revolution (1765-1783)

  • Causes of the Revolution

  • Declaring Independence

  • Turning Points of the War

  • War’s End and Lasting Effects

 

Creating the Constitution (1781-1789)

  • A Confederation of States

  • Drafting the Constitution

  • Ratifying the Constitution

 

The New Republic (1789-1816)

  • Government and Party Politics

  • The Struggle Over Foreign Policy

  • The Age of Jefferson

  • The War of 1812

 

Module 3: Expansion and Reform (1812-1860)

 

In this module, students analyze the significant events in the founding of the nation and its attempts to realize the philosophy of government described in the Declaration of Independence. Students learn about the constitution in more detail and understand the extent to which nationalism and sectionalism influenced the formation of the United States.

 

Chapter 7: Nationalism and Sectionalism (1812-1855)

 

  • Industry and Transportation

  • Sectional Differences

  • An Era of Nationalism

  • Democracy and the Age of Jackson

  • Constitutional Disputes and Crises

 

Chapter 8: Religion & Reform (1812-1860)

 

  • A Religious Awakening

  • A Reforming Society

  • The Anti-Slavery Movement

  • The Women’s Movement

 

Chapter 9: Manifest Destiny (1800-1850)

 

  • Migrating to the West

  • Texas and the Mexican American War

  • Effects of Territorial Expansion

 

 

Module 4: Civil War & Reconstruction (1846-1877)

 

In this module, students analyze the significant events in the founding of the nation and its attempts to realize the philosophy of government described in the Declaration of Independence. Students examine the events of the civil war and reconstruction.

 

The Union in Crisis (1846-1861)

  • Slavery, States’ Rights, and Western Expansion

  • A Rising Tide of Protest and Violence

  • Political Alignment Deepens the Crisis

  • Lincoln, Secession, and War

 

The Civil War (1861-1865)

  • Resources, Strategies, and Early Battles

  • African Americans and the War

  • Life During the War

  • Turning Points of the War

  • The War’s End and Impact

 

The Reconstruction Era (1865-1877)

  • Rival Plans for Reconstruction

  • Reconstruction in the South

  • The End of Reconstruction

  

Module 5: Industrialization of the United States (1865-1914)

 

In this module, students analyze the relationship among the rise of industrialization, large-scale rural-to-urban migration, and massive immigration from Southern and Eastern Europe. Students also examine the events that led to the First World War.

 

The triumph of Industry (1865-1914)

  • Technology and Industrial Growth

  • The Rise of Big Business

  • The Organized Labor Movement (p.450)

 

Immigration & Urbanization (1865-1914)

  • The New Immigrants

  • Cities Expand and Change

  • Social and Cultural Trends

 

The South & West Transformed (1865-1900)

  • The New South

  • Westward Expansion and the American Indians

  • Transforming the West

 

Issues of the Gilded Age (1877-1900)

  • Segregation and Social Tensions

  • Political and Economic Challenges

  • Farmers and Populism (p.533)

 

 

U.S. History B

 

Module 6: Emergence of the Modern United States (1890-1920)

 

In this module, students analyze the relationship among the rise of industrialization, large-scale rural-to-urban migration, and massive immigration from Southern and Eastern Europe. Additionally, students trace the rise of the United States to its role as a world power in the twentieth century. Students also research events, which lead to the First World War and its end.

  

The Progressive Era (1890-1920)

  • The Drive for Reform

  • Women Make Progress

  • The Struggle Against Discrimination

  • Roosevelt’s Square Deal

  • Wilson’s New Freedom

 

An Emerging World Power (1890-1917)

  • The Roots of Imperialism

  • The Spanish-American War

  • The United States and East Asia

  • The United States and Latin America

 

World War I and Beyond (1914-1920)

  • From Neutrality to War

  • The Home Front

  • Wilson, War & Peace

  • Effects of the War

 

Module 7: Prosperity and Depression (1919-1941)

 

In this module, students analyze the major political, social, economic, technological, and cultural developments of the 1920s. Students also analyze the different explanations for the Great Depression and how the New Deal fundamentally changed the role of the federal government..

  

The Twenties (1919-1929)

  • A Booming Economy

  • The Business of Government

  • Social and Cultural Tensions

  • A New Mass Culture

  • The Harlem Renaissance

 

Chapter 21: The Great Depression (1928-1932)

  • Causes of the Depression

  • Americans Face Hard Times

  • Hoover’s Response Fails

 

Chapter 22: The New Deal (1932-1941)

  • FDR Offers Relief and Recovery

  • The Second New Deal

  • The Effects of the New Deal

  • Culture of the 1930’s

 

Module 8: World War II and Postwar America (1931-1960)

 

In this module, students analyze America’s participation in World War II and the economic boom and social transformation of post–World War II America. Students also analyze U.S. foreign policy since World War II.

  

The Coming of War (1931-1942)

  • Dictators & War

  • From Isolation to Involvement

  • America Enters the War

 

World War II (1941-1945)

  • The Allies Turn the Tide

  • The Home Front

  • Victory in Europe and the Pacific

  • The Holocaust

  • Effects of the War

 

The Cold War (1945-1960)

  • The Cold War Begins

  • The Korean War

  • The Cold War Expands

  • The Cold War at Home

 

Postwar Confidence & Anxiety (1945-1960)

  • An Economic Boom

  • A Society on the Move

  • Mass Culture and Family Life

  • Dissent and Discontent

  

Module 9: Challenges & Change (1945-1980)

 

In this module, students analyze U.S. foreign policy since World War II and the development of federal civil rights and voting rights. Students also examine the major social problems and domestic policy issues in contemporary American society.

  

The Civil Rights Movement (1945-1975)

  • Early Demands for Equality

  • The Movement Gains Ground

  • New Successes and Challenges

 

The Kennedy and Johnson Years (1960-1968)

  • Kennedy and the Cold War

  • Kennedy’s New Frontier

  • Johnson’s Great Society

 

The Vietnam War Era (1954-1975)

  • Origins of the Vietnam War

  • US Involvement Grows

  • The War Divides America

  • The War’s End and Impact

  • Nixon and the Cold War

 

An Era of Protest and Change (1960-1980)

  • The Counterculture

  • The Women’s Rights Movement

  • The Rights Revolution Expands

  • The Environmental Movement

 

A Crisis in Confidence (1968-1980)

  • Nixon and the Watergate Scandal

  • The Ford and Carter Years

  • Foreign Policy Troubles

  

Module 10: Changing and Enduring Issues (1980-Today)

 

In this module, students analyze the economic boom and social transformation of post–World War II America along with U.S. foreign policy since World War II with particular focus on contemporary foreign policy.

 

The Conservative Resurgence (1980-1993)

  • The Conservative Movement Grows

  • The Reagan Revolution

  • The End of the Cold War

  • Foreign Policy After the Cold War

 

Into a New Century (1992-Today)

  • The Computer and Technology Revolutions

  • The Clinton Presidency

  • Global Politics and Economics

  • Bush and Obama Presidencies

  • Americans Look to the Future

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